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Journal of the Texas Guildmages – Meeting Number 962

Written by Jeff Zandi on . Posted in Competitive Magic, Limited

Journal of the Texas Guildmages – Meeting Number 962

Jeff Zandi

Jeff Zandi is a level 2 judge and an eight-time veteran of the Pro Tour. He has written continuously about Magic for over eighteen years. His team, the Texas Guildmages, have the longest running regular game in history, meeting at his home every Tuesday night since 1996.

Shadows over Innistrad Booster Draft

The clock has just about run out for Shadows over Innistrad booster draft. The coming of Eldritch Moon is right on time, gauging the interest from among my Guildmage brothers. The guys get tired of drafting the same set for too long. After three long months of drafting nothing but Shadows, the gang craves something new. I thought Eternal Masters would provide a nice break for our Tuesday night drafts, and it did, for two weeks. However, while there was genuine interest in drafting Eternal Masters, this prestige set also ran off some of the regulars. When I announced on Facebook that we would have Eternal Masters available to draft, some of the guys who didn’t want to blow thirty-something bucks for a fancy booster draft chose to stay home. The next time that Wizards makes a cash-grab with a set like Eternal Masters, and you know they will, my team will try to make sure to prioritize the current competitive draft format and keep fancy-pants expensive set drafts for late night or alternative night use. Of course, there are other reasons for fluctuating attendance. Summer affects everybody’s schedule differently. Some people are getting out of school, others are going on vacation. Lots of stuff. Oh, and it’s super hot outside everyday.

After two weeks of having just six players, I was thrilled that a total of eleven people showed up for one of our last Shadows over Innistrad drafts. We drafted with nine players and played three Swiss rounds before cutting to a final four. This is pretty common on Tuesday nights, playing just three rounds of Swiss with nine players. You really need four rounds for nine players but the players prefer to finish the draft a little quicker, either to allow folks to head home earlier because of early morning responsibilities, or so that we can draft again afterwards. When you play just three rounds of Swiss with nine players, you end up with one or even two players who have 2-1 records but who do not make the top four cut. When this happens, we give the 2-1 player who was cut a single random draw from the prize cards when the draft is over. We always play for the rares, mythics and foils. It’s usually a pretty small consolation prize for the person cut out of the final four by tiebreakers but at least it’s something.

Tonight’s Winning Decks

Scot is just about the most experienced player in the room and has had the most success of any of us when it comes to Shadows draft. Still, I was surprised to see how well he did with this blue/black control deck. For one thing, it’s a true control deck, something that I didn’t know you could really pull off in Shadows over Innistrad. Half of his spells cost four or more mana. Among them are his win conditions. No surprise there. He can win games with single creature threats like Markov Dreadknight or Morkrut Necropod.

The Dreadknight reminds me of older times in Magic when a card like this 3/3 flying Vampire Knight would have been one of the best creatures in the set. This is still a powerful card today, at least in limited, but I think we’ve all become jaded by power creep. Five mana for a 3/3 doesn’t seem great anymore, but Scot has drafted this set enough times to know that after opponents spend their removal spells on other things earlier in the game, Markov Dreadknight can dominate games late. For one thing, the skies are just less full in Shadows over Innistrad. Flyers therefore mean a little bit more than usual. Morkrut Necropod doesn’t have flying but menace gives him a kind of evasion and keeps opponents from simply chump blocking him with a single meaningless creature in the late going. Because the Necropod doesn’t hit the board until at least turn six and doesn’t get turned sideways until at least turn seven, his downside isn’t as dramatic as it might seem. Attacking with a 7/7 that can’t be blocked by a single creature is worth the sacrifice of a land or creature. The only thing Scot doesn’t want to see when he attacks with Morkrut Necropod is a bounce spell. A third single creature win condition is Elusive Tormentor. It’s amazing how often this 4/4 for four mana monster ends games all by himself. In the best situations he starts attacking when the opponent is under ten life. You discard a card to flip the Tormentor so that he can attack unblocked, then you pay 2B to flip him face up again to deal four points of damage. When you only need to get this guy in for two or three attacks, it rarely matters what card you have to throw away in order to make him lethal, it’s worth it.

The other two big win conditions in the deck are spell-based. From Under the Floorboards could put three 2/2 black Zombie tokens onto the battlefield as soon as Scot can afford to spend 3BB. Better yet, Scot can discard From Under the Floorboards to some other effect and then pay XBB to put X 2/2 Zombies onto the battlefield and gain X life. Scot has all kinds of madness outlets including Sinister Concoction, Catalog and Elusive Tormentor. It’s possible, but not as likely, that he would have enough mana to make it a good idea to discard this spell when playing Pore Over the Pages. But you get the point, Scot has lots of ways to make this spell better than its normal value. Its normal value is pretty good too, by the way. Scot can also make gobs of Zombies with Rise from the Tides. This spell may be the reason Scot runs a couple of instants and sorceries that might have otherwise been cut, like Confirm Suspicions or Press for Answers. Press for Answers is easy to include in any case but Scot certainly wants to make the most out of a late game Rise from the Tides.

That’s a lot of win conditions for a draft deck. The challenge, as with all control strategies, is to survive long enough in the early game to deploy the win conditions in the late game. Scot faces this challenge some cheap removal spells and a handful of cheap creatures including Ghoulcaller’s Accomplice (he’s basically two creatures), Prized Amalgam, Crow of Dark Tidings and Stitched Mangler.

The fact is, Scot started out white. His first pick was Angelic Purge, and then Ken Pender passed Scot From Under the Floorboards, apparently taking Throttle over it. Scot happily accepted the black sorcery as his second pick and then followed it up with a third pick that wouldn’t ultimately go in the deck, Fiery Temper. Then Scot picked up Stitched Mangler. Scot remembers that the blue cards just kept coming to him after that. Scot admitted that his deck’s curve was a little on the high side, that he feared aggressive decks, like green/white or red/white, would get him before he could stabilize. I asked Scot about Confirm Suspicions in particular. He said that the spell has been good for him in the past. He admitted that he didn’t get much out of it in tonight’s draft. Oh, he countered several key spells, that’s the only thing I would have been concerned about. Scot considered the spell less successful for him tonight because he wasn’t able to use all the Clue tokens produced by Confirm Suspicions. I think we can score that as a humble brag. Finally, Scot thinks highly of Markov Dreadknight. He says it’s usually a 5/5 flyer, even if it has to live a turn and survive an activation of its ability to get there. I agree with Scot that the Dreadknight is better in a format where there are fewer flyers and fewer green monsters with reach. Scot says this card will go up in value in Eldritch Moon drafts because the flyers in EMN are equally scarce and even smaller than in Shadows over Innistrad.

Patrick goes down the same road as Scot as far as color and overall deck archetype are concerned, but Patrick’s deck is very different from Scot’s. The first thing that occurs to me is Pat’s mana base. Scot went with seventeen land powering eleven spells that cost four, five or six mana. Patrick’s deck almost stops at four mana, just a pair of cards cost five, and yet he runs eighteen land. Also, Patrick’s deck is full of duplicates of cards, a feature that gives his deck more consistency. It’s not that hard to have duplicate copies of cards when you draft three packs of the same set, but Scot’s deck had a second copy of only one card, Murderous Compulsion. It may indicate that Patrick was on his colors sooner. Scot’s deck has more cards that are individually more powerful, but Patrick’s deck shows that he acquired a target and stayed on it throughout the draft.

Patrick has more early game cards than Scot, but they aren’t exactly heavy hitters. Patrick has a pair of matching bounce spells where Scot has two Murderous Compulsion. That’s not an even trade. Still, Patrick has four different creatures he can play on turn two and seven he can play on turn three. That’s a very smooth curve. Kindly Stranger only costs three to play but she is often really a six-drop. It doesn’t pay to play her before you have (a) delirium and (b) the mana needed to activate her transform ability.

Among the six cards that cost four mana each, Patrick has one of the same home run hitters as Scot, an Elusive Tormentor that Patrick picked first in the draft. A pair of Drownyard Explorers provide defense and some deferred card draw (doubled if Erdwal Illuminator is in play). Then there are the three copies of Sleep Paralysis, Patrick’s choice of common MVP for the deck. He says he likes Sleep Paralysis in this kind of deck.

Patrick said that when he took Elusive Tormentor with his first pick he was hoping for something kind of fast, like black/red. His second pick was a red removal spell, he didn’t remember which one. When red dried up after that, Patrick saw that the blue cards were flowing and so he turned towards blue/black tempo. The deck plays well and has the good consistency, I wish I had learned what the eighteenth land was about.

The Matchup

These two decks, similar-looking at first glance, play very differently. I wouldn’t call Patrick’s deck fast, but Scot’s deck is definitely slow. I detailed the exact play-by-play of a match I played with the two decks. You can find that play-by-play at the bottom of this article. Before I played that match I played ten other games between these two decks. In those ten games, Scot’s deck had a slight edge over Patrick’s.

The difference was power. Both decks have Elusive Tormentor, but Scot’s deck also has Markov Dreadknight and Morkrut Necropod and two Zombie-makers. Six of the ten practice games came down to who could play a better card later in the game. Scot’s deck won those six games. However, Scot’s deck can also be unruly and his deck creates more opening hands that you aren’t excited about. Anything with just two lands, for example. Patrick’s pair of Reckless Scholars are better than average in this matchup. With a Scholar in play, Patrick’s draws become better than Scot’s even though Scot has some powerful cards he can draw. The tempo of Patrick’s deck also puts a strain on Scot’s deck.

In the actual draft tournament tonight, Scot and Patrick each went 2-1 in the Swiss rounds. Scot beat Chris Weng and yours truly before losing in round three to Jon Toone. Patrick lost to Ian Jasheway in round one (who went 3-0 in Swiss) before rebounding against Blake Bombich and Chris Weng in rounds two and three. They each played against an undefeated opponent in the final four and they each prevailed.

I played a total of thirteen games between these two decks and while Scot’s deck won seven of those games I’m giving a slight nod to Patrick’s deck based on its better mana curve and its consistency. With the right draws, Patrick’s deck is a solid tempo deck that can abuse slower decks. Advantage Patrick.

Guildhall Draft Finalists Year to Date

 

Listed here are the number of times a player has reached the finals of one of our Swiss booster drafts.

8 Jeff Zandi
7 Mark Hendrickson
7 Scot Martin
5 Lawson Zandi
3 Matt Banks
3 Jon Toone
3 Tuan Doan
2 Aaron Tobey
2 Michael Ferri
1 William Oats
1 Brian Heine
1 Maitland Griffith
1 Blake Bombich
1 Matt Tuck
1 Stephen Marshall
1 Bassel Said
1 Cesar Collazo
1 Cole Campbell
1 Patrick Lynch

Over the period we’ve been drafting Shadows over Innistrad, Scot Martin has had the most success with six of his finals appearances coming during this period (since April 4th).

Roll Call

 

Ken Pender arrived first, a whole hour early. That’s fine, I have Standard decks to practice and intend on playing in one more Standard PPTQ this weekend before the end of the qualifying season for Pro Tour Honolulu. Ken’s playing Esper Control and I’m playing Green/White Tokens. I haven’t had much success with my deck yet. It certainly doesn’t catch anybody by surprise.

Patrick Lynch shows up next. He usually picks up his dinner from the deli section of the Tom Thumb grocery store just down the street.

Chris Weng arrives next and is greeted warmly on the occasion of his first visit to the Guildhall. Chris is the guest of Patrick Lynch, they worked together for a while recently in some aspect of Information Technology. Chris only picked up Magic a few years ago and is already competing in Legacy tournaments. He worked for a little while at Madness Games in Plano, the biggest and arguably best game shop in Texas and beyond. Every first time guest at the Guildhall is asked for their favorite Magic card of all time. Our team maintains a binder containing the favorite Magic card of each person to ever play with us. The choices must be unique, however, so occasionally someone has to settle for their second or even third choice. Still, with over two hundred cards having been “retired” to our personal Magic card hall of fame, it’s amazing that most people get their first choice. Chris got his first choice, and it didn’t take him long to identify his favorite Magic card, Master of the Pearl Trident.

Blake Bombich has been an iron man on Tuesday nights since he began coming in September, 2014. Lately, however, Blake has been distracted by his other major love, auto racing. Actually, Blake loves anything to do with cars. He works as an automotive mechanic and owns a collection of Ford Mustangs which he customizes and races. He’s here for the second straight week but he missed the four weeks before that. He had almost never missed as many as two meetings in a row before that.

Ian Jasheway has been about the most competitive member of the Texas Guildmages over the past couple of years. He has been distracted by college during that time but has since graduated so that he can be distracted by deciding to either look for a job or go to school for a while longer. All along the way, he keeps his Magic game sharp without having nearly enough time or money to invest in it.

Scot Martin arrives next. Scot returned to competitive Magic three years ago after quite a long break during which time he concentrated on his career in Information Technology and in creating a family. Scot had early success in the Pro Tour, finishing in the money at Pro Tour Columbus in 1996. That was only the third Pro Tour event ever! He remained extremely competitive through 2004 before taking an almost ten year break from the grind of weekly tournaments. Even during that time, however, Scot would dabble with Magic online and at the occasional prerelease event. Scot is one of two original Texas Guildmages (including yours truly) to play competitively.

Jon Toone makes an appearance tonight. We don’t see Jon as much as we used to. He works at Miniature Exchange, a game store owned by our mutual friend Erin Giddings. Jon came to us via Hunter Burton a decade ago. This week is the third anniversary of Hunter Burton taking his own life. Jon and Ian were particularly close to Hunter and always note this time of year with some sadness. We all miss Hunter, a good friend and just about the most successful Texas Guildmage ever.

Tuan Doan is back for the second week in a row. He works at Fidelity Investments in Southlake, about half an hour from my Coppell address. Tuan texts me that he will be arriving a little late due to bad traffic snarls. There are eight of us waiting past seven o’clock (our normal start time) until he finally walks through the door at 7:26 pm. That’s when Tuan tells us that Maitland Griffith is also on his way. The group is already a little grumbly from waiting this long for Tuan. Tuan contacts Maitland to see if he is so close that we need to wait a little longer to begin our draft. It is determined that Maitland isn’t close enough to wait for, so we start without him. Maitland arrives just as we are drafting the second booster pack. Maitland is understandably unhappy at making the difficult trip through traffic only to be too late to play. He hangs around for two hours before deciding to head home. He might have stayed to play in a team draft if the Swiss draft had been moving along more quickly. It’s doubly awkward because Maitland had gone out of his way last Tuesday night to join us when our initial attendance only numbered four players. Maitland Griffith is a good guy and a good player and I hope he won’t be so disappointed from tonight’s traffic problems that he gives up on attending on Tuesdays.

Thanks for reading.

Texas Guildmage meeting #962, Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Roll Call (in order of arrival)

Jeff Zandi, Guildmage #7.

Lawson Zandi, junior Guildmage, 2nd meeting in a row, 347th lifetime.

Ken Pender, guest, 1st meeting in a row, 172nd lifetime.

Patrick Lynch, guest, 1st meeting in a row, 146th lifetime.

Chris Weng, guest, 1st meeting in a row, 1st lifetime.

Blake Bombich, guest, 1st meeting in a row, 84th lifetime.

Ian Jasheway, Guildmage #37, 1st meeting in a row, 66th lifetime.

Scot Martin, Guildmage #4, 1st meeting in a row, 264th lifetime.

Jon Toone, Guildmage #28, 1st meeting in a row, 228th lifetime.

Tuan Doan, guest, 2nd meeting in a row, 90th lifetime.

Maitland Griffith, guest, 2nd meeting in a row, 9th lifetime.

Meeting ran from 6:01 pm to 11:45 pm

Here’s the play-by-play of a match played between the two finalists’ decks. No sideboards are used for this match and I played both sides of the match. Growing up an only child, I have a unique ability to play both sides of a game without favoritism or bias for either side. All I want to do is learn what happens when one deck battles the other.

GAME ONE

T1 Scot keeps two Island, Swamp, Catalog, Sinister Concoction, Ghoulcaller’s Accomplice and Twins of Maurer Estate. Plays Swamp, plays Sinister Concoction.

T1 Patrick keeps three Islands, Swamp, Stitched Mangler, Reckless Scholar and Drownyard Explorers. Draws and plays Swamp.

T2 Scot draws Swamp, plays Island, plays Ghoulcaller’s Accomplice.

T2 Patrick draws and plays Island.

T3 Scot draws Rise from the Tides, plays Swamp, attacks with Accomplice (18-20).

T3 Patrick draws Rattlechains, plays Island, plays Reckless Scholar, at end of turn Scot plays Catalog drawing Morkrut Necropod and Swamp, Scot discards Swamp.

T4 Scot draws Crow of Dark Tidings, activates and sacrifices Sinister Concoction targeting Reckless Scholar discarding Twins of Maurer Estate and milling Island into his graveyard from the top of his library (18-19), Twins madness ability triggers and Scot pays 2B to put Twins onto the battlefield, attacks with Accomplice (16-19).

T4 Patrick draws Island, plays Swamp, plays Drownyard Explorers putting a Clue token onto the battlefield.

T5 Scot draws and plays Swamp, plays Crow of Dark Tidings milling Swamp and Just the Wind into his graveyard from the top of his library.

T5 Patrick draws Niblis of Dusk, plays Island, plays Niblis of Dusk.

T6 Scot draws and plays Island, attacks with Crow (14-19), plays Morkrut Necropod, at end of turn Patrick plays Rattlechains.

T6 Patrick draws and plays Swamp, activates and sacrifices Clue token drawing Compelling Deterrence, plays Stitched Mangler targeting and tapping Morkrut Necropod, attacks with Niblis and Rattlechains (14-14).

T7 Scot draws and plays Pore Over the Pages drawing Silent Observer and From Under the Floorboards and Confirm Suspicions, Scot untaps a Swamp and an Island, Scot discards Confirm Suspicions.

T7 Patrick draws and plays Vampire Noble, plays Island, attacks with Rattlechains and Niblis, Crow blocks Niblis (14-12), Crow triggers when it dies milling Sleep Paralysis and Swamp into his graveyard from the top of his library.

T8 Scot draws Elusive Tormentor, attacks with Morkrut Necropod sacrificing Ghoulcaller’s Accomplice, Patrick plays Compelling Deterrence targeting Necropod, Scot discards From Under the Floorboards and its madness ability triggers, Scot pays 4BB to put four black 2/2 Zombie creature tokens onto the battlefield tapped (14-16).

T8 Patrick draws and plays Erdwal Illuminator, attacks with Rattlechains (14-14).

T9 Scot draws and plays Island, plays Silent Observer.

T9 Patrick draws and plays Elusive Tormentor.

T10 Scot draws Prized Amalgam, plays Rise from the Tides putting five black 2/2 Zombie creature tokens onto the battlefield tapped.

T10 Patrick draws and plays Kindly Stranger, activates Elusive Tormentor discarding Island, Tormentor transforms into Insidious Mist, attacks with Mist, when Mist is unblocked Patrick pays 2B to transform Mist back into Tormentor (14-10).

T11 Scot draws Island, attacks with nine Zombie tokens, one token each is blocked by Drownyard Explorers and Vampire Noble and Kindly Stranger and Stitched Mangler and Erdwal Illuminator and Rattlechains (8-10), plays Morkrut Necropod, plays Island.

T11 Patrick draws Island, activates Elusive Tormentor discarding Island transforming Tormentor into Insidious Mist, attacks with Mist, pays 2B to transform Mist back to Tormentor (8-6).

T12 Scot draws Island, plays Elusive Tormentor, plays Prized Amalgam, attacks with Necropod sacrificing a tapped Island, Illuminator and Mangler block Necropod.

T12 Patrick draws Swamp.

T13 Scot draws Murderous Compulsion, activates Elusive Tormentor discarding Island to transform it into Insidious Mist, attacks with Mist and Twins of Maurer Estate and four Zombie tokens and Prized Amalgam and Necropod sacrificing a tapped Island, Explorers and Tormentor block Necropod, Kindly Stranger blocks Zombie token, Patrick discards Swamp to transform Tormentor into Insidious Mist (-4 -6).

SCOT MARTIN WINS GAME ONE ON TURN 13, LEADS MATCH 1-0

GAME TWO

T1 Patrick keeps two Islands, Ghostly Wings, Stitched Mangler, Sleep Paralysis, Elusive Tormentor and Erdwal Illuminator. Plays Island.

T1 Scot throws back an opening hand containing four Islands, Swamp, Confirm Suspicions and Elusive Tormentor. Keeps two Swamp, two Island, Morkrut Necropod and Ghoulcaller’s Accomplice. Scry for one putting Island on the bottom of his library. Scot draws and plays Swamp.

T2 Patrick draws and plays Warped Landscape, plays Erdwal Illuminator.

T2 Scot draws and plays Island, plays Ghoulcaller’s Accomplice.

T3 Patrick draws Drownyard Explorers, plays Island, plays Stitched Mangler tapping Ghoulcaller’s Accomplice, attacks with Illuminator (20-19).

T3 Scot draws and plays Island.

T4 Patrick draws Compelling Deterrence, attacks with Illuminator and Mangler (20-16).

T4 Scot draws and plays Swamp, attacks with Accomplice (18-16), at end of turn Patrick activates and sacrifices Warped Landscape searching his library putting a Swamp onto the battlefield tapped.

T5 Patrick draws and plays Island, plays Drownyard Explorers, Illuminator triggers and Patrick gets two Clue tokens instead of one, attacks with Illuminator and Mangler (18-13).

T5 Scot draws and plays Furtive Homunculus, plays Swamp.

T6 Patrick draws and plays Island, attacks with Illuminator and Mangler and Explorers, Accomplice and Homunculus block Explorers, Patrick plays Compelling Deterrence bouncing Ghoulcaller’s Accomplice back to Scot’s hand, Scot discards Island, combat damage happens (18-10), Patrick activates and sacrifices a Clue token drawing Reckless Scholar.

T6 Scot draws and plays Island, plays Morkrut Necropod.

T7 Patrick draws and plays Gone Missing targeting Necropod putting it on top of Scot’s library, Illuminator triggers and Patrick gets two Clue tokens instead of one, attacks with Illuminator and Mangler and Explorers (18-5).

T7 Scot draws and plays Morkrut Necropod, plays Island.

T8 Patrick draws and plays Island, plays Sleep Paralysis enchanting and tapping Morkrut Necropod, attacks with Erdwal Illuminator and Stitched Mangler and Drownyard Explorers (18-0).

PATRICK LYNCH WINS GAME TWO ON TURN 8, TIES MATCH 1-1

GAME THREE

T1 Scot throws back an opening hand of two Islands, Elusive Tormentor, Sinister Concoction, Twins of Maurer Estate, Stitched Mangler and Confirm Suspicions. Keeps two Islands, Swamp, Elusive Tormentor, Pore Over the Pages and Drunau Corpse Trawler. Scry for one putting Swamp on top of his library. Plays Swamp.

T1 Patrick keeps three Islands, Elusive Tormentor, Reckless Scholar, Drownyard Explorers and Rattlechains. Draws Furtive Homunculus, plays Island.

T2 Scot draws Swamp, plays Island.

T2 Patrick draws Vampire Noble, plays Island, plays Furtive Homunculus.

T3 Scot draws Markov Dreadknight, plays Swamp.

T3 Patrick draws and plays Island, attacks with Homunculus (20-18), plays Reckless Scholar.

T4 Scot draws Swamp, plays Island, plays Drunau Corpse Trawler putting a 2/2 black Zombie creature token onto the battlefield.

T4 Patrick draws Stormrider Spirit, activates Scholar drawing Compelling Deterrence and discarding Vampire Noble, attacks with Homunculus blocked by Corpse Trawler, plays Island, plays Drownyard Explorers putting a Clue token onto the battlefield.

T5 Scot draws Catalog, plays Swamp, plays Markov Dreadknight.

T5 Patrick draws and plays Swamp.

T6 Scot draws Murderous Compulsion, attacks with Dreadknight, Patrick plays Stormrider Spirit, Spirit blocks Dreadknight, Scot activates Dreadknight discarding Catalog and putting two +1/+1 counters on Dreadknight.

T6 Patrick draws and plays Swamp, attacks with Explorers (20-16), plays Elusive Tormentor.

T7 Scot draws Sinister Concoction, attacks with Markov Dreadknight, Patrick plays Compelling Deterrence targeting Dreadknight, Scot discards Pore Over the Pages, Scot plays Sinister Concoction, activates and sacrifices Concoction targeting Elusive Tormentor discarding Murderous Compulsion and milling Rise from the Tides into his graveyard from the top of his library (20-15), Murderous Compulsion triggers when discarded and Scot pays 1B to play Compulsion targeting Drownyard Explorers.

T7 Patrick draws Swamp, activates and sacrifices Clue token drawing and playing Swamp, activates Scholar drawing and discarding Swamp.

T8 Scot draws Island, attacks with Zombie token (18-15), plays Markov Dreadknight, at end of turn Patrick plays Rattlechains.

T8 Patrick draws Furtive Homunculus, activates Scholar drawing Drownyard Explorers and discarding Swamp, plays Drownyard Explorers putting a Clue token onto the battlefield, plays Furtive Homunculus.

T9 Scot draws Sleep Paralysis, plays Elusive Tormentor.

T9 Patrick draws Kindly Stranger, activates and sacrifices Clue token drawing Island, activates Scholar drawing and discarding Island, plays Kindly Stranger.

T10 Scot draws Swamp, plays Sleep Paralysis enchanting and tapping Kindly Stranger.

T10 Patrick draws Stitched Mangler, activates Scholar drawing Erdwal Illuminator and discarding Island, plays Erdwal Illuminator, plays Stitched Mangler tapping Markov Dreadknight, attacks with Rattlechains (18-13).

T11 Scot draws Swamp, plays Island.

T11 Patrick draws and plays Gone Missing putting Markov Dreadknight on top of Scot’s library, Erdwal Illuminator triggers and Patrick gets two Clue tokens instead of just one, attacks with Rattlechains and Illuminator and Homunculus, Homunculus blocked by Zombie token (18-10).

T12 Scot draws and plays Furtive Homunculus, plays Swamp, plays Markov Dreadknight, at end of turn Patrick activates and sacrifices a Clue token drawing Sleep Paralysis.

T12 Patrick draws Sleep Paralysis, plays Sleep Paralysis enchanting Elusive Tormentor.

T13 Scot draws Crow of Dark Tidings, at end of turn Patrick activates and sacrifices his Clue token drawing Reckless Scholar, Patrick activates Scholar drawing Compelling Deterrence and discarding Reckless Scholar.

T13 Patrick draws and plays Warped Landscape, plays Sleep Paralysis enchanting and tapping Markov Dreadknight, attacks with Rattlechains and Illuminator and Explorers and Mangler (18-3).

T14 Scot draws and plays Island, plays Crow of Dark Tidings milling Island and Press for Answers into his own graveyard, at end of turn Patrick activates and sacrifices Warped Landscape searching his library putting an Island onto the battlefield tapped.

T14 Patrick draws and plays Vampire Noble, attacks with Illuminator and Rattlechains and Explorers and Mangler, Crow blocks Rattlechains, Homunculus blocks Explorers (18-0).

PATRICK LYNCH WINS GAME THREE ON TURN 14, WINS MATCH 2-1

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