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Learning Legacy: Eldrazi Stompy

Written by Joshua Claytor on . Posted in Competitive Magic, Legacy

Learning Legacy:  Eldrazi Stompy

Joshua Claytor

Joshua is the current content manager of Legitmtg.com and Puremtgo.com.

Before I start, I want to acknowledge the issues that the site has been having recently. We’ve been trying very hard to deal with the clickjacking that is going on, and while it is a losing battle so far, we’ve made some progress. On the boring backend of things, the account that was responsible for people logging in and making changes no longer exists and we’ve not had a malicious login since December 21st. While my personal computer is not getting clickjacked, I understand it is still an issue. For that, we apologize, and will continue to work to not only clean up the site, but also earn your trust again, while also continuing to deliver some great Magic: The Gathering content. Thank you for your understanding and patience!

With that out of the way, and 2018 coming in with a bang, I decided that this year was the year that I would start to give Legacy a fighting chance. While it is priced out of my budget in paper, it’s much more manageable on Magic: The Gathering Online, and with good friends, I am able to borrow nearly whatever I want in order to try to figure out what I want to do in this format. The last Legacy event I played was way back when Flash was legal, and if I recall correctly, the Grand Prix for it happened to start the day before the ban of the card went into place. Turns out I did not remember this correctly, Flash was not banned until after the Grand Prix. An 18 year old Steve Sadin went on to win the event, while playing FlashHulk Counterbalance while an 18 year old Owen Turtenweld started to really make his mark on the game with a second place finish with Goblins.  Looking back at this top eight, it was fairly remarkable in terms of talent.  Bill Stark was there, running a sweet mono black list with Carnophage and Hymn to Tourach.  Gadiel Szleifer was on Flash Hulk, and looking at event coverage from ten years ago is super weird.  You can of course check it out here.

I did not make it out of Day one, which was completely fine by me.  I went more to have fun then I did for any other reason.  Cassius had been born 17 days before the event, and to me, it was basically one last chance to play the game and see the world.  Even if the game was a format that I had just a passing interest in, and the world was the city I was born in.  I was hesitant to go at all, because I wanted to be home with my wife and son, but was granted her blessing and away I went, off to a 4-5 record with Goblin Charbelcher in my deck.  I think one of the highlights of how poorly the event went for me was playing against a player that had Shelter in their main deck, no sleeves and took a game from me.  It was the last real road trip I took for a Magic event, as responsibilities, rising costs and a desire to finish college finally kept me home most weekends.

I am not sure how much this play more Legacy project of mine will last. I’m clearly not an expert in the format, and will love Modern until WotC tells me not to love it anymore. I’m not sure how they would go about doing that, but I am sure it involves the creation of a new format. I’m not looking at Legacy to see if my stance about the Reserved List needs to change or not, because honestly, I think the Reserved List is good for the game and still has usefulness. I am however, willing to learn about the format and see just how much entertainment I can get out of it. Belcher is great, but there is more to the format than spirit guides and artifact mana.

We start our look at Eldrazi Stompy, and I would be remiss if I did not note the fantastic work that Tyler Priemer did for this site and Legacy. I pulled up an old article of his on the subject gave it a quick read, and went to work.

Here is the list that I played. It’s a basic Eldrazi Stompy list, and I kept it simple, because I did not want to overthink myself, and I figured that this could be straightforward enough, but also complicated enough to where I couldn’t just play the deck on autopilot. There are some decisions that need to be made with Chalice of the Void that are important. There are interactions with Eldrazi Mimic that you need to take care of to make sure you are maximizing damage or protecting your Mimics from combat.

Wow, this deck was a heck of a lot of fun to play! It reminded me a lot of the old Dragon Stompy decks but instead of Rakdos Pit Dragon and Blood Moon we have Thought-Knot Seer and Chalice of the Void. We’ve got big mana threats with Oblivion Sower and Endless One lumbering in to play as soon as turn three. In a format where my beloved Charbelcher and storm decks exist this monster can chug along with them.

While a 3-2 record is not really a lot to brag about, it felt pretty good all things considered. I don’t think I made to many errors with the game play, I might have played cards cards in the wrong order, for example, I would cast a Reality Smasher (which is still bugged on MTGO by the way) when an Endless One would have allowed my Mimic to grow and present another piece of pressure for the turn after, when I would add Smasher to the board. Proper sequencing does matter, no matter what format you play.

Here is the deck in action from the stream.

This is a deck I would play again in the future. It felt very flexible, had a lot of must answer threats, but it’s not as great on MTGO because of the Reality Smasher bug. That for sure needs to be fixed before I could comfortably recommend playing this deck.

Next time, I plan on casting Reanimate. Because that is a ton of fun as well!

Thanks for joining us!

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